SYNETIQ secures contract with Stocalfe Response

 The UK’s largest salvage and vehicle recycling company has announced a new partnership with Stocalfe Response, a provider of accident and fleet management services.

As part of the relationship, SYNETIQ will exclusively handle salvage vehicles involved in motor claims on behalf of Stocalfe Response. This agreement will provide Stocalfe Response with unrivalled returns for its total loss vehicles.

 

 

Steve Dodson, Client Relationship & Business Development Director, said: “I’m pleased to welcome Stocalfe Response as our newest client. We’ve worked closely with their team to make sure the transition was a smooth one and I’m delighted to report that everything’s working really well.”

Stocalfe Response is based in Warrington and offers a full management service, including credit hire and intervention hire. It works with a wide range of clients and customers; handling claims on vehicles ranging from small cars to HGVs.

 

 

 

 

SYNETIQ has announced its intention to expand its Gloucester site after sharing the news with its clients and colleagues last week. 

A multi-million-pound investment is already underway that will deliver new concrete works, large-scale racking systems, more purpose-built depollution facilities, and remodelled premium breaking and parts storage facilities. 

The changes will mean the closure of the long established Cinderford site by the end of September, with the migration of most of its employees, capabilities and processes transferring to the new flagship SYNETIQ site. 

This announcement of SYNETIQs commitment to expansion in the South West follows shortly behind a similar strategy and show of commitment to expanding its operations in Scotland to provide national coverage for clients and customers. 

 

Jason Cross, Client Director of SYNETIQ said:

 

The investment in the expansion of our Gloucester site is exciting, driven by our aspiration to lead the industry whilst delivering an exceptional, compliant and innovative service to our clients. This move is testament to our confidence in our business and our people, who will have the chance to develop and grow within our ambitious and scalable organisation.”

 As Coronavirus caused unprecedented disruption to businesses across the UK, SYNETIQ, as a DEFRA-classified key service, continued to support its key worker clients, including Insurers, Ambulance services, Police forces and supermarket delivery vehicles, providing salvage and dismantling services, green parts and Mechanical Solutions and this investment is continued evidence of that commitment.

 

June 2020

Tyre Recovery Association Limited

 

TRA alarmed at proposed Europe-wide ban on rubber infill

 

A proposal by the European Chemical Agency (ECHA) to ban the use of tyre-derived rubber infill in sports surfaces has been deemed incomprehensible and counter-intuitive by members of Britain’s Tyre Recovery Association.

The ECHA is pushing for a ban on the reuse of materials containing ‘intentionally added’ microplastics such as tyres from 2028 even though new tyres themselves do not appear to be captured by this initiative.  The TRA estimates that in the course of their service lives, car tyres alone shed some half a million tonnes of micronized rubber annually across the continent of Europe.

Commented TRA Secretary General, Peter Taylor, “This proposal is not only disproportionate but flies in the face of reason, if implemented it would set back our recycling efforts by a generation.  Rubber infill is not only largely site-contained but can also be further recycled.” He went on, “Tyre-derived granulate is not just used in this particular application but also in a range of other products used by the automotive industry, belting and very many others so minimizing the wider use of primary resources, furthermore it is not a micro-particulate.

This ECHA proposal if implemented is contrary to the ideals and objectives of the circular economy as well as undermining the values of the waste hierarchy.  It would not only hobble the progress made in developing innovative uses for tyre-derived material but would cause us to fall back on incineration as one of the few available disposal options for our post-consumer tyres.  As such it is economically and environmentally illiterate and we must, as an industry, unite to fight it.

 

For press enquiries please contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Useful links

www.tyrerecovery.org.uk  

About the TRA

A cornerstone of the body is its unique Responsible Recycler Scheme.  All TRA members are fully accredited by the scheme, which ensures that all tyres collected, recycled or reprocessed by them are disposed of or reused in environmentally friendly and acceptable methods. The Tyre Recovery Association has the independent ability to pursue these objectives at both industry and government levels, generate performance data specific to its member’s interests as well as develop stronger links across the tyre recycling world. See more at: http://www.tyrerecovery.org.uk

 

Tyre Recovery Association, Offices above STS Tyre Pros, Corner of Park Street and Osier Way,

 

Park Street, Aylesbury, Bucks, HP20 1DX

 

The Federation have been asked to investigate the potential for a recovery driver catching the Coronavirus (Covid-19) from a vehicle that he or she is collecting from a person identified as carrying the illness. 

It must be made very clear that BVSF staff are NOT experienced or medically trained so are relying on information found and received when investigating this potential and cannot be held responsible for any expert errors in this regard.

The new Coronavirus is, as we know, a respiratory illness, which means it typically spreads when an infected person coughs or sneezes, droplets carrying viral particles can land on someone else's nose or mouth or get inhaled.

But, a person can also catch the new coronavirus if they touch a surface or object that has viral particles on it and then touch their mouth, nose, or eyes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The lifespan of the virus on a surface — a door handle,  a stair banister, or even money — depends on many factors, including the surrounding temperature, humidity, and type of surface.

Although we are initially advised the likely lifespan is only hours to perhaps a day, the variables can make the life expectancy, potentially a lot longer.

How long the coronavirus survives on surfaces

A study recently published in the Journal of Hospital Infection looked at the lifespans of other coronaviruses found in humans on various surfaces. The SARS coronavirus for example, at a temperature of 20 degrees Celsius, lasted for two days on steel, four days on wood and glass, and five days on metal, plastic, and ceramics. (The researchers also found that one strain of SARS lasted up to nine days on a plastic surface at room temperature.)

It is suggested that these timescales are likely to apply to the new coronavirus, since smooth, nonporous surfaces like doorknobs and tabletops are better at carrying viruses in general. Porous surfaces — like money, hair, and fabric — don't allow viruses to survive as long because the small spaces or holes in them can trap the microbe and prevent its transfer.

Your smartphone, with all its glass and aluminum, can also carry viral particles.

On the basis of the above it would appear that a vehicle could conceivably pose a danger to a recovery staff member for a week, perhaps even a little longer after having an infected person within it sneezing/coughing etc etc.

As members of the Federation it is up to you how you deal with this potential timescale as of course you will not be sure when the last time a carrier of the illness will have been in the car potentially leaving the virus in there.

The surrounding temperature makes a big difference

The recent study also found that spikes in temperature made a difference in the lifespans of coronaviruses. An 10-degree Centigrade jump, from 20 degrees to 30 degrees, decreased how long SARS lasted on steel surfaces by at least 50%.

That's because some coronaviruses, including this new one, have a fat layer that protects viral particles when traveling from person to person in the air. That sheath can dry out, however, killing the virus. So higher humidity, moderate temperatures, low wind, and a solid surface are all good for a coronavirus' survival which of course could be a problem for members when getting into a car owned or used by a Coronavirus sufferer.

This also explains why respiratory viruses are typically seasonal as cooler temperatures help harden the protective gel-like coating that surrounds the particles.

How to disinfect surfaces

The authors of the recent study noted that human coronaviruses could be "efficiently inactivated" on surfaces within one minute if they're cleaned with solutions containing 62% to 71% ethanol alcohol, 0.5% hydrogen peroxide, or 0.1% sodium hypochlorite.

It is possible that these surface disinfectants could even work within 15 seconds according to experts but to get the kill rates advertised on the packaging, though, that usually involves waiting for several minutes — between five minutes and six minutes." BUT, how much of a car do you clean !!!

Stop touching your face, and wash your hands

The importance of washing your hands and not touching your face must be strongly emphasized— those are the best ways to minimize your chance of picking up the coronavirus from surfaces.

However, the “experts” advise that you cannot become infected through your hands alone so if you never touch your eyes, nose or mouth you will be far safer….how many of us can manage that though !

.BVSF…using widely available external information.