Vehicle operator licensing: a digital future

Paper application forms will no longer be available on GOV.UK from 01 April 2018

 

From 01 April, we're removing the main operator licensing forms from GOV.UK.

Research shows that operators are familiar with digital services and also confident using them.

We want more people to use the Vehicle Operator Licensing service because it's quicker for compliant operators.

You can find out about the changes by reading DVSA's Moving On blog. 

 

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PRESS RELEASE

Recycling Lives’ rapid growth continues with ninth site nationally

A recycling firm has topped off a year of rapid growth with its fifth site acquisition in 12 months.

Recycling Lives, a recycling and waste management firm headquartered in Preston, Lancashire, has announced its takeover of a facility in Erith, Kent.

It has taken over the former Pick-a-Part business, securing the jobs of 12 staff and set to create additional roles in the business.

The site is now Recycling Lives’ ninth nationally, having opened five across Cumbria, Greater Manchester, Merseyside, the Midlands and South East in 2017 alone, to add to its four sites in Lancashire.

The facility will allow the firm - which specialises in scrap metal and scrap car processing - to depollute and recycle End-of-Life Vehicles (ELVs) in the region. The organisation is also looking to introduce its charitable activities into the South East, having already expanded its food redistribution programme further across the North West this year, including introducing its offender rehabilitation model into the area.

Managing director William Fletcher said: “This move tops off our biggest year to date, where we’ve tripled our turnover and more than doubled our national footprint. 

“We’re proud to have secured the jobs of a great team in Erith and are excited to introduce our unique business offering to the South East. We’re already exploring opportunities to expand our charitable and social activities into the Kent area.”

Recycling Lives runs a unique social business model, using its commercial recycling and waste management operations to directly support and sustain and number of its own charity and social programmes.

It manages its own residential facilities to offer a safety net to homeless, marginalised men; runs an offender rehabilitation programme in nine North West prisons; and manages food redistribution in partnership with national charity FareShare to reduce food waste and tackle food poverty.

Operations at the Erith site, on Darent Industrial Park, will now shift from breaking cars for parts to processing and recycling vehicles down to composite parts ready for reuse or remanufacture.

To learn more, visit: www.recyclinglives.com 

 

About Recycling Lives:

Recycling Lives is a multi-award-winning social business that combines commercial and charitable operations.  Its highly successful commercial activities, undertaking recycling and waste management with a commitment to 100% diversion from landfill, directly support and sustain a number of charitable ventures and social enterprises, including offender rehabilitation, food redistribution and a residential charity.

The company has operated in the recycling sector for 40 years.  With nine sites nationwide, including in Lancashire, Merseyside, Greater Manchester, Cumbria, the Midlands and South East, its main 15-acre Recycling Park is home to state-of-the-art machinery, including Europe’s only fully-digitised fragmentiser.

Its charity works to create social impact through social and environmental initiatives.  In 2015/16 it created £4.1m social value through its activities.

Its HMP Academies programme is operational in nine prisons nationwide.  These academies allow offenders to undertake meaningful work, in recycling and fabrication processes, while improving skills and earning qualifications, in order to reduce their risk of reoffending.

Its Release Potential programme supports ex-offenders to find employment and accommodation, and works with a number of leading UK businesses.  Its residential charity offers structured support, accommodation and training opportunities to homeless adults.  

Its Food Redistribution Centre is tackling food poverty and reducing food waste.  It takes surplus goods from food manufacturers, suppliers and supermarkets – which would have been destined for landfill – and distributes it to charities and community groups working in deprived areas and with disadvantaged groups.  The Centre has redistributed close to 1,000,000 meals and diverted more than 400 tonnes of goods from landfill since launch in October 2015.

Its residential charity offers a safety net to homeless adults, and is a base from which they can develop life and work skills to regain their independence and move into meaningful work and stable accommodation.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION: Katie Upton on This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. / 07387 015426

 

 

The MD of Car Transplants Ltd, John Schofield, has produced a video to showcase what the company can offer, not only as a BVSF member but as a forward thinking salvage management company also. 

Click on the video below to see it for yourself, alternatively, use the link above to open it in a new window. 

 

The EA have released a leaflet outlining the correct handling of End of Life Vehicles (ELVs).

By folloing the below link, you will be able to read a PDF version of the leaflet. 

 

Handling end-of-life vehicles (ELVs) what do you need to do?

 

Reminder – HGV speed limit changes in England and Wales

Red-yellow-lorries

From 6 April 2015, the speed limit for HGVs travelling on single and dual carriageways in England and Wales will be increased.

Following consultation and announcements made last year, the national speed limits for HGVs over 7.5 tonnes, travelling on a single carriageway will increase from 40mph to 50mph. The speed limit for HGVs over 7.5 tonnes, travelling on dual carriageways will increase from 50mph to 60mph.

The limits in Scotland are staying the same. European speed limiter requirements also remain unchanged and must be set at 56mph or lower.

The introduction of the new speed limits will better reflect the need for a modern transport network.